Tonawanda News

Local News

April 25, 2013

N-W opts not to cut kindergarten

Tonawanda News — WHEATFIELD — Appeasement may be the easiest way to quell a riled up crowd of people, as Niagara-Wheatfield school board members found out Wednesday.

Facing a room of about 200 parents, grandparents and students looking to rip into a recent decision to explore eliminating kindergarten districtwide, officials reversed course and kept the program.

Instead, officials closed an estimated $1 million budget gap by cutting even more teachers one year after slashing more than 40 instructors in the worst planning session Niagara-Wheatfield has faced in more than a decade.

“The members of the board of education will not be cutting kindergarten to either half day or fully eliminating it,” board President Steve Sabo said. “Kindergarten will be fully funded in the budget which we (will) put before the public on May 21. I know that this is the answer that so many of you are in attendance to hear.”

Wednesday’s action led to the adoption of a spending plan for 2013-14 that increases district spending by about $2.3 million, to $62.8 million, by proposing a 5.91 percent tax levy increase.

The increase in taxes is the maximum percentage Niagara-Wheatfield is allowed under New York’s property tax levy threshold cap, due to exemptions school districts are allowed to factor into cap calculations.

But the focus of the audience was still on kindergarten, unsafe another year unless voters approve the district’s proposal at the polls May 21. Sabo said the budget proposal relies on the tax levy increase to provide whatever programs are left, including kindergarten, all sports and music and art programs district students have excelled in locally and state-wide.

Sabo said cutting kindergarten, brought to the public eye last week, wasn’t something he or the rest of the board members took lightly.

“Contrary to what’s said, we’re not a bunch of people who go home and say ‘Let’s have some fun and cut kindergarten,’” Sabo said. “I have a son there right now, I see the growth the children experience at that level. We know the effect cutting it will have and we don’t want to do it.”

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